Window in a Round Wall

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window-in-round-wall

In SketchUp, components can only automatically cut holes on single faces as demonstrated in this tutorial. Even when it comes for openings to cut holes on both outer and inner faces of a thick wall, we need to use workarounds as described in this tutorial.

Now as components cannot even cut holes in round surfaces, we need to truly intersect our openings into these objects. In this tutorial, we'll show two ways (one for users of the Pro version and one for those of the Free version) how to cut a simple window into a curved (cylindrical) wall.

Face-me Billboard Component

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face-me-thumb

In this tutorial, we are going to explore how to create a Face-me Component in SketchUp. In other applications, these are often called "billboard" components. Their main feature is that they consist of a single face (although they can be more complex, too) but they always face the camera so we can use them as backdrops in our scenes without having to load high-poly 3D models. Usually they are used in the background however as from closer look, they may not look too convincing and it is often hard to take birds-eye-view shots where they reveal their thin appearance.

Window to Cut Opening on a Face

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window-thumb

In SketchUp, a component (or as a matter of fact, a group too) can be "glued" to a face and also cut an opening on it. This feature allows modellers to quickly place windows, doors etc. on the faces of a building and immediately make a virtual opening on it without having to physically "cut" that hole on the face. These components can be moved on this face without their cutting feature lost.

Unfortunately, a component can only have one gluing (cutting) plane so a simple component cannot cut only one face which means we need to apply workarounds for thick walls (described in another tutorial).

Edges Bleeding Through Geometry

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bleeding-edges-thumb

In SketchUp, when one does not model with accurate thickness of geometry, it is natural that edges touching faces will be visible "outside", too. But edges may "bleed through" even geometry modelled with proper thickness. Unfortunately, the reason is the underlying OpenGL rendering engine and apart from some workarounds, we cannot do too much about it.

If we understand the whole phenomenon, however, our workarounds can be tailored to our needs and the result can be as pleasing as anything else in ASketchUp.

How to model a Palm tree - Part 2

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how to model a palm tree in sketchup - the leaves

Now for the fun part! Modeling leaves in SketchUp is a straightforward task but when you add some plugins into the mix it is a very simple and quick process.

In this tutorial you will use transparent .png images to reduce modeling time.

This is the second part to the Modeling a Palm Tree tutorial

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Hans Wegner Chair - Part 2, The Legs

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eric-intro

If you followed the tutorial published in the latest CatchUp edition, here is part 2: how to model the legs of the Hans Wegner Chair in SketchUp.

Beside the basic SketchUp tools like PushPull, Intersect, Mirror or Paint, you will need Fredo's Joint PushPull plugin for this tutorial to follow. Download it from here and make special care to follow the installation instructions as this plugin consists of several files and subfolders.

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Halo around transparent png files

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curved-treeline-th

In SketchUp, we always have to balance between performance and quality. We try to keep poly-count, image sizes low, use styles that are faster while modelling etc. This is also the case with image transparency. While modelling, try to use a style that is fast enough but when we want to export our final 2D output, of course, we want to have the nicest images possible. In SketchUp, you can notice that sometimes - when images with transparent areas are "stacked" in front of each other - there is a rather "ugly" halo around the images. This is due to some style setting however and can be overcome when we export images.

How to model a Palm tree - Part 1

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Model a Palm Tree n SketchUp

Making any type of vegetation in SketchUp is a challenge. Here we'll use some common techniques, plugins and tricks to make the process of modeling a Palm tree quick and easy.

This is aimed at any skill level and is the first in a 3 part series. You will learn how to make an irregular element, taper it and bend it to bring it to life.

 

Texturing a component vs. its faces inside

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component-face-materialsWe can certainly read a lot about what the basic difference between texturing a component or group "from outside" (its editing context) or by editing it and applying the materials directly to the faces. Here is a basic intro about the differences in the SketchUp Help Center.

This tutorial is not about these trivia but about a common mistake when sometimes even experienced users are stumped (especially with models made by others). The "symptom" usually is that people are trying to pull their hair because they simply cannot position the material and do not know why.

Aligning the Rotate and Protractor tools

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aligning-rotate-tool

For new users, it is often extremely frustrating that they cannot seem to align the Rotate or Protractor tools in any, arbitrary direction / angle. Below are some basic tips on how to do this easily. Some of what is written here can be applied for the Circle, Polygon or Rectangle tools as well.

To practice any of the methods below, best is to create a simple model which has some edges/faces that are not aligned to any of the world axes and major planes defined by them. Group your geometry first and pre-select it before starting the Rotate (or in other cases the Move) operation. Of course, for the Protractor tool, you need not pre-select anything.

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