Model This: Training

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Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Sun Dec 26, 2010 8:50 pm

i called it training because there's not really a final model (ala solo's and eric's model this threads).
maybe use this thread to post little individual challenges that may arise while modeling something bigger and better.



i'll start with this example: [Edit -- I'll update this post when new Model_this(es) are added to the thread]


challenge #1
a larger tube splitting off into two smaller&reducing tubes.. (maybe part of an exhaust system for instance)

why_template_su6.skp


why.jpg


i have a decent idea of how to do this which shouldn't be too hard/time consuming.. i'll try it out and post it up a little later.
how would you draw it?


-and- feel free to post your own mini challenge.



Challenge #2
submitted by d12dozer -- Intersecting a curb with a driveway

viewtopic.php?p=297130#p297130

Capture2.PNG
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby solo » Sun Dec 26, 2010 9:48 pm

Jeff,

These little 'training' exercises are always great, too bad there is no way to catalogue and save it for folks to find when in need of a solution for a similar shape.
The cool thing about Sketchup is it's a thinking app, with many solutions to the same problem, and with all the great plug-ins we are sometimes spoilt for choice which can also make choosing the best solution even more difficult.

Initially when I saw that shape I thought to myself SDS, as that's a tool I can use to make almost anything as I'm pretty fluent with it, I also thought TIG's extrude tools which I would probably have tried first but I must admit I cannot get the results that are in my head and the right choice of tool and selection of faces and lines in order with TIG's tools to create anything close to what I need.

Anyway, here is a quick go with SDS2, created a proxy and divided, I just eyeballed dimensions, so it's probably not scaled right but the general idea is there.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Sun Dec 26, 2010 10:59 pm

wow pete, that's way different than the approach i went for.. (used curviloft and bezierspline)
i recorded the method i went for but it's uploading to youtube right now.
i'll post it in a bit.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby EscapeArtist » Mon Dec 27, 2010 12:38 am

Curviloft, Weld, Bezierspline.

Converted classic Bezier curve to polyline divider to control number of segments generated by curviloft.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Mon Dec 27, 2010 1:28 am

that looks pretty good jeff.. a little more in line with the approach i went with (uploading to youtube is taking forever atm :D )


you mind showing how you made these splines? are the done in one shot from end to end or multiple splines welded together?

learn.jpg




[edit] - now that i think about it.. that's sort of the way i tried doing the accelerate sofa: (building all the splines then skinning)
viewtopic.php?p=206253#p206253

i didn't really even think about doing it like that on this model.. maybe i'll give it a go and see if i can do it any faster/better that way.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Mon Dec 27, 2010 2:12 am

here's a screen recording of the process i used.. now with voiceover :D



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QaLys482sQ&hd=1
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby derei » Mon Dec 27, 2010 2:27 am

Very nice indeed! sometimes, in such simple things we can see how powerful plugins are made for SketchUp. I've learned a very strong lesson here, though I consider myself a good sketchup user. Thanks for this.
You could use a tangent arc with 3 segments instead of 15 segments spline, I guess.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby EscapeArtist » Mon Dec 27, 2010 3:45 am

I simplified as much as I could by only doing 1/2 of the model frame, then copying/flipping it; this also gives the benefit of symmetry. The ends are circles. The bottom spline is a bezier also copied to the top, the outside spline is a bezier too. The inner spline is bezier with a basic arc, welded, to make the "groin" a smooth arc.

edge.jpg


The edge(s) you are pointing to are duplicates. To make the spline I made a triangular "work surface" for lack of a better word, necessary because the bezier tools have minimal inferencing and it would be the only way to ensure that the line stayed within the volume of the object. I inferenced the first edge along the green axis (arrow), then completed the triangle where I wanted the spline to end/begin. Draw bezier as desired; I did inference the "groin" portion of the curve on the red axis in order to make a smooth transition across the arch.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby Jim » Mon Dec 27, 2010 3:50 am

Holy sh!t, thanks Jeff - I never thought to use undo to go back in order to copy a face, then move forward to paste it - brilliant.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby mitcorb » Mon Dec 27, 2010 4:05 am

Yea that go back and copy forward is a nice little trick. I probably thought it would violate the laws of causality and entropy and so never tried it. But Jeff, I believe is a Tralfamadorian and I am a mere earthling.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby modelhead » Mon Dec 27, 2010 4:32 am

It is fascinating to see the differences in the interpretation of the shape. I guess it is about expectation. So far you are mimicking but neither shape look much like the original on close inspection....or is the expectation lower than I think in this case.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Mon Dec 27, 2010 4:52 am

modelhead wrote:It is fascinating to see the differences in the interpretation of the shape. I guess it is about expectation. So far you are mimicking but neither shape look much like the original on close inspection....or is the expectation lower than I think in this case.

it's more about the approach.. which could be applied to actual dimensions if need be.

fwiw, the original picture was drawn earlier today in the same loose manner. it's a lot easier to do in rhino but i wanted to see how people might approach it in sketchup.

[edit] here's how the original one was drawn.. (and you'll notice i took a similar approach in sketchup)
a lot shorter though no voiceover.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby dale » Tue Dec 28, 2010 1:27 am

A different method... Taper maker and follow me.. Fun challenge
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby simon le bon » Tue Dec 28, 2010 1:40 pm

Hey,, Nice training!

Hi Jeff,
I see you pursue with your specific technique using Uniform B-Spline
Bravo for the video which explains very well.
And also I must say that watching the second video, Rhino seems to be an extraordinary modeler!!!

thanks, simon
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby modelhead » Tue Dec 28, 2010 2:22 pm

Ok...this time it is looking more like the Rhino piece...nice!
It would be helpful to keep a graphical collection of the pieces as they are completed at the head of this thread. Just a single image to paste these pieces into. The model pieces could be labeled to corresponding text or video in the thread. If a lot of common shapes are added and modeled the thread will become a great source of reference for training on specific shapes.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby d12dozr » Wed Dec 29, 2010 5:12 am

Nice Jeff, the video really helps understand the process.

Here's another simple training exercise...I'm curious how you guys model the intersection of a curb and driveway, or curb and crosswalk. I'm hoping there is an easier way than I currently do it. I'll post my method a little later.

Reference image of what I mean...
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Wed Dec 29, 2010 5:34 am

i take it the curb's profile is angled sides with a flat top and rounded edges?
something like this?

curb.jpg




[going with modelhead's advice.. i'll update the top post to highlight&link to additional challenges added to the thread]
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby d12dozr » Wed Dec 29, 2010 5:45 am

Like this:
Capture2.PNG


Then it flattens out at the driveway.
Edit...like this:
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Wed Dec 29, 2010 8:21 am

oh, i didn't see your other picture prior to uploading this video but i think you can do it the same way as i'm showing only without the arc.. just an angle down for followme..





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uxr3hGcRACw&hd=1
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby Dave R » Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:17 pm

Slick! :thumb:
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby simon le bon » Wed Dec 29, 2010 12:22 pm

Hi Jeff,
You are "on the fly", please keep it on :thumb: :thumb:

RE1:
I would really like to love Su developing team as I love SketchUp and its fair community.. But What they do and what they don't do is unpleasant to me :cry: . Boolean Tools is their tool of the year (one tool=one upgrade: I'm not kidding so much) ( :lol: ) and they dig one more step the gap between free and pro versions. I say to u "GSUTeam : your mind is wrong! Can you hear that?"
Anyway I have bought Whaat BoolTools for long and for 10$ and which works perfectly until SU5 so Dear team no matter to spend xxx$ for SU8 pro :evil:


Re2:
Jim wrote:Holy sh!t, thanks Jeff - I never thought to use undo to go back in order to copy a face, then move forward to paste it - brilliant.

+1 :thumb: it is also what I had thought when viewing the video.
This remind me a tutorial which was on the old SCF tutorials section
A tutorial dealing as you do with the "Undo command" and named "Back to the futur"
At this time I was new to SketchUP and the concept was hard to me.
Now I can take advantage of it, it has disappeared...

But hey hey
There is Internet Wayback Machine !!
and Here is Back to the future tutorial:

Cheers,

simon.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby jeff hammond » Wed Dec 29, 2010 9:42 pm

mitcorb wrote:Yea that go back and copy forward is a nice little trick. I probably thought it would violate the laws of causality and entropy and so never tried it. But Jeff, I believe is a Tralfamadorian and I am a mere earthling.


LOL.
i had to google some of those words to see what you were saying. funny :D

simon le bon wrote:Hey,, Nice training!

Hi Jeff,
I see you pursue with your specific technique using Uniform B-Spline
Bravo for the video which explains very well.
And also I must say that watching the second video, Rhino seems to be an extraordinary modeler!!!

thanks, simon


that move i do with the extension line for the b splines is basically an adaptation of what i see happening in other modelers only those one usually do it automatically :D
notice in the rhino video that i don't do any of that stuff because it's already happening within the tools.

and yeah, rhino is great.. i'm slowly but surely learning the ins/outs of it and it may just one day eliminate sketchup from my workflow ;) [actually, i don't really think it will becasue sketchup is just way too fast to draw simple objects (walls,slabs,etc.) which in reality is most of a drawing i may do.. when the compound curves come into play though, i'll be using rhino for sure.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby d12dozr » Wed Dec 29, 2010 10:17 pm

That's really close to how I made the curb, Jeff. Your way is faster using the Solid tools...I need to learn the ins and outs of them.

Here's what I did:
YouTube - Dropped Curbs in Sketchup


I split the curb into 2 sections, made a separate follow-me path for each section, then used Intersect to get rid of the excess (I didn't have SU8 then). Now, I couldn't get good results with Union, maybe because of overlapping faces? I'll have to play more with the Solid Tools.
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby mitcorb » Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:06 am

Jeff wrote:
"LOL.
i had to google some of those words to see what you were saying. funny :D"

Well, I don't do too much else around here, so, if I can make one person laugh, it's not a total loss. :D
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Re: Model This: Training

Postby Humpmetwice » Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:23 am

Liking the videos Jeff. Make things seem so easy!
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